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Anglican Faith and Practice

Learn more about the essentials of Anglican belief and worship from these important documents.

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St. Andrew; November 30

This entry is part 35 of 43 in the series Hobart's Commentary on the Church Year

As St. Andrew was the first who found the Messiah,* and the first who brought others to him, the Church, for his greater honor, commemorates him first in her anniversary course of Holy Days, placing his festival at the beginning of Advent, as the most proper to bring the news of our Saviour’s coming.

* John i.38-41.

[Excerpt from John Henry Hobart, A Companion for the Book of Common Prayer, Containing an Explanation of the Service (1859), 77.]

The twenty-fifth Sunday after Trinity

This entry is part 25 of 43 in the series Hobart's Commentary on the Church Year

The twenty-fifth Sunday after Trinity being considered as a preparation, or forerunner to Advent, an Epistle was chosen for it, which clearly foretells the coming of CHRIST. The Collect, Epistle, and Gospel, are thought so appropriate to this season, that it is directed, by a rubric, after the Gospel, that they shall always be used on the Sunday next before Advent.

[Excerpt from John Henry Hobart, A Companion for the Book of Common Prayer, Containing an Explanation of the Service (1859), 111.]

Thanksgiving Day

This entry is part 33 of 43 in the series Hobart's Commentary on the Church Year

In addition to the foregoing Festivals and Fasts, the Protestant Episcopal Church in the United States of America has appointed the first Thursday in November (unless some other day be appointed by the civil authority) as a day of thanksgiving to ALMIGHTY GOD, for the fruits of the earth, and all other blessings of his merciful providence. And the Church has prescribed a solemn form of service for the day, every way calculated to excite the sentiments of devout and holy gratitude.

[Excerpt from John Henry Hobart, A Companion for the Book of Common Prayer, Containing an Explanation of the Service (1859), 114.]